Clemency

What is Clemency?

Individuals with a past conviction must have their civil rights restored through the executive clemency process. Only the Governor and his cabinet, sitting as the Board of Executive Clemency, have the power to restore civil rights. The entire process is complicated and takes years. Even then, since the decision rests in the sole discretion of these politicians, there is no guarantee that an individual’s rights will be restored.

Voting Laws of Each State

Alabama – May apply to restore voting rights after completion of full sentence. Certain felony offenses are not eligible.
Arizona – Automatic voting restoration after completion of sentence and all fines paid for first-time, single felony. Second time felony may apply for restoration with their county after sentence is completed.
Delaware – People convicted of a felony (with some exceptions) are automatically eligible to vote after serving their full sentence.
Florida – Automatic restoration of civil rights and the ability to vote will not be granted for any offenses.
Iowa – May apply after you pay all outstanding monetary obligations to the court in addition to completing their sentence.
Kentucky – People convicted of any felony in Kentucky must individually apply with the Governor.
Mississippi – Barred from voting only if they have been convicted of certain felonies. Individuals convicted of felonies in Mississippi remain eligible to vote for US President in federal elections.
Nevada – Automatically restored to all people convicted of a nonviolent felony after the sentence completion. Second felony, must seek restoration of their voting abilities in the court in which they were convicted.
Tennessee – May apply to the Board of Probation and Parole for voting restoration upon completion of their sentence.
Wyoming – First-time nonviolent felony may apply to the Board of Parole for voting restoration five years after completion.
Vote Restored After Completion of all the following:
  • Term of Incarceration
  • Parole
  • Probation
Alaska
Arkansas
Georgia
Idaho
Kansas
Louisiana
Minnesota
Missouri – People convicted of “a felony or misdemeanor connected with the right of suffrage” are not permitted to vote.
Nebraska – People convicted of a felony are automatically permitted to vote two years after completion of their sentence of incarceration and all parole and probation for all convictions except treason.
New Jersey
New Mexico
North Carolina
Oklahoma
South Carolina
South Dakota
Texas
Virginia – Non-violent felonies (including drug crimes) will have their ability to vote automatically restored after completion of everything.
Washington – Convicted felons must be up to date with payments to courts or can lose voting rights.
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Vote Restored After Completion of:
  • Term of Incarceration
  • Parole
California – Those in county jail can vote.
Colorado
Connecticut
New York
Vote Restored After Completion of:
  • Term of Incarceration
District of Columbia
Hawaii
Illinois
Indiana
Maryland – Rights restored immediately upon release from prison.
Massachusetts
Michigan
Montana
North Dakota
Ohio
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
Utah
Maine
Vermont

Here is a List of Courts For You to Apply

Criteria To Apply For Clemency

Application For Clemency